Home Tags Posts tagged with "Severe DUI"

Severe DUI

0 228

We doubt that you have any interest in hitting the streets this snowy weekend, but we take our Ohio OVI Blog very seriously, so we figured we’d do our checkpoint list anyway.

Not suprisingly, there aren’t any planned in the areas we called. Per usual, we checked throughout Northeast Ohio.

As always, no checkpoints doesn’t mean driving drunk is an option. The roads will be slippery and the cops will still be on the lookout. If you do go out and drink, designate a driver.

Have a great weekend. If you do stay in, feel free to spend some time on our Cuyahoga County DUI site. Or, if you have a personal injury, workers’ comp or DUI case, give us a call.

0 449

One of the first things people ask me when they get arrested for DUI or OVI is, ‘What’s going to happen to me?’

This is an understandable concern. To understand what the possible consequences of a conviction or a guilty plea are, you have to consider the severity of your offense. While I would recommend immediately contacting a lawyer who can fully explain the legal process to you, here’s a brief overview of the myriad Ohio DUI penalties. Remember, while there are certain minimum penalties, the judge ultimately determines the appropriate sentence.

First DUI conviction in six years AND low test (meaning below .170 on breathalyzer)  
This is a misdemeanor of the 1st degree and can mean:

  • Minimum of three days in jail or a driver intervention program with probation. The maximum is six months in jail.
  • Treatment may be ordered.
  • Minimum $375 fine. Maximum $1,075 fine.
  • A class five license suspension (six months to 3 years).
  • Driving privileges after 15 days unless you refuse to blow at the station, in which case it becomes 30 days.
  • Restricted plates and interlock system are both optional.

While none of those consequences sound appealing, things get worse if you blew a high test (meaning above .170) or have been convicted in the last 20 years and refused to blow on this occasion.

First DUI conviction in six years AND high test or prior conviction and refusal
This is also a misdemeanor of the 1st degree and can mean:

  • Minimum of three days in jail or a driver intervention program with probation. The maximum is six months in jail.
  • Treatment may be ordered.
  • Minimum $375 fine. Maximum $1,075 fine.
  • A class five license suspension (six months to 3 years).
  • Driving privileges after 15 days.
  • Mandatory yellow license plates (DUI plates) and interlock device.

Things only get worse from there. While we won’t go into every potential detail of a severe conviction, this level of consequence begins with people found guilty of their fourth or fifth DUI in six years or sixth in 20 years. Things can escalate from there based on whether the person had a high test breathalyzer, has even more DUIs and the like, but, believe me, the resulting sentences aren’t pretty.

Consequences of severe DUI conviction
This is a felony-level conviction and can mean:

  • Jail time of 120 days to five years.
  • A fine range of $1,350-$10,000.
  • Driving privileges after 3 years.
  • Mandatory treatment.
  • Mandatory yellow license plates and interlock device.

As you can see, penalties differ based on current and past circumstances (want an extreme example? How about the man who was put in jail for life after his ninth DUI conviction.) Moreover, being underage will also affect potential penalties. For an even broader scope of potential penalties, you can visit our Cuyahoga County DUI site or see an exhaustive overview at ovilaw.com.  Moreover, many of these consequences come with ranges or an option determined by the legal system, so having a lawyer with experience in these cases is an absolute must.

Need more information about DUI/OVI in Ohio? Feel free to comment on any of my blogs or contact me at briantaubman[at]Taubmanlaw.net. You can also find out more about our DUI/OVI practice at CuyahogaCountyDUI.com.

Like us a lot? Then like us on Facebook
Want information from us on Twitter? Follow Taubman Law or the OhioOVINetwork