Home Tags Posts tagged with "Cleveland"

Cleveland

0 244

The city of Cleveland announced this afternoon that it will have a driver’s license checkpoint in the Second District tomorrow (April 21). The rest of the details (time, location) were not available at the time of the release, but should be out tomorrow morning.

As always, if you are not a licensed driver, you shouldn’t be driving. Cops throughout Northeast Ohio are on the lookout, so be safe and be smart.

0 328

Happy Thursday to you, Northeast Ohio. Thanks for taking time out of your day to check out our checkpoint list for the weekend of April 15-17.

Let’s get right down to business. It looks like a quiet time for checkpoints, as we didn’t hear about any scheduled for this Friday or Saturday. There are a few areas we haven’t heard back from yet, but below are the places we called that said no for this week.

As we mentioned last week, Euclid, Elyria and Akron/Summit County will be having them later this month and in May, so be sure to come back to the Ohio OVI Blog for details.

Have a great weekend. Remember, you can contact us if you need help with an OVI case in Ohio.

Beachwood – NO
Bedford – NO
Berea – NO
Brecksville – NO
Brooklyn – NO
Brooklyn Heights – NO
Broadview Heights – NO

Canton – NO
Cleveland Heights – NO
Cleveland – NO
Chesterland – NO
Garfield Heights – NO

Euclid – NO
Kent – NO
Lakewood / Ohio Highway Patrol – There was no release this week regarding Cuyahoga County OVI checkpoints run by The Ohio Highway Patrol
Independence – NO
Medina – NO
Mentor – NO
Middleburg – NO
North Royalton – NO
North Ridgeville – NO
Olmsted Falls – NO
Olmsted Township – NO
Parma – NO
Parma Heights – NO
Portage County Sheriff’s Department – NO
Rocky River – NO
Shaker Heights – NO
Seven Hills – NO
Seville – NO
Streetsboro – NO

Stark County Sheriffs Department – NO
Strongsville – NO
Stow – No
South Euclid – No
University Heights – NO
Wadsworth – NO
Warren – NO
Westlake – NO

Willoughby – NO
Youngstown – NO

0 341

Good day to you, Northeast Ohio. The Ohio OVI Blog is back with another list of checkpoints for the weekend of April 8-10.

Before we get down to business: Have you read our post about the SCRAMx alcohol monitoring? We had a test subject wear an ankle monitoring bracelet for the Indians home opener to see what the bracelet would say. The result was pretty interesting.

OK, back to the usual stuff. We found out about one confirmed checkpoint this week. Here are the details: Maple Heights will have one Friday from 8-12 pm at Henry and Libby, by the Great Western Juice.

During our research this week we also found out about a number of future checkpoints. Here’s the details on those.

Akron/Summit County does not have one this week, but has one tentatively scheduled for April 29th. We’ll update you when we know more.

Elyria does not have one this week, but has one scheduled for April 30 from 10pm to 2am. More details on that when we get them.

Euclid does not have one this week but has one tentatively scheduled for May 27.

Below is the list of other areas we called this week who told us they do not have a checkpoint scheduled as of today. Have a great weekend.

Beachwood – NO
Bedford – NO
Berea – NO

Brecksville – NO
Brooklyn – NO
Brooklyn Heights – NO
Broadview Heights – NO
Cleveland Heights – NO
Cleveland – NO
Chesterland – NO

Garfield Heights – NO
Kent – NO

Lakewood / Ohio Highway Patrol – There was no release this week regarding Cuyahoga County OVI checkpoints run by The Ohio Highway Patrol
Independence – NO
Medina – NO

Mentor – NO
Middleburg – NO
North Royalton – NO
North Ridgeville – NO

Olmsted Falls – NO
Olmsted Township – NO
Parma – NO
Parma Heights – NO
Portage County Sheriff’s Department – NO

Rocky River – NO
Shaker Heights – NO
Seven Hills – NO
Seville – NO

Streetsboro – NO
Strongsville – NO
South Euclid – NO

University Heights – NO
Wadsworth – NO

Warren – NO
Westlake – NO

Our subject and his SCRAMx monitor

Here at the Ohio OVI Blog we strive to get out all of the information possible about OVI laws in Ohio so that people can realize the danger in drinking and driving and practice control. As such, we’ve been working with Alternative Horizon Counseling to find out more about alcohol monitoring programs. Because they like us, they allowed us to have a test subject wear a SCRAMx ankle bracelet during the Cleveland Indians home opener last week (See our previous post about what a SCRAMx is). It didn’t take us a long to hook up with a test subject who was willing to have us monitor his drinking for the special occasion. The hard part was getting him to take appropriate notes of the day.

Below is his journal from that day. We’d like to thank him for taking the time to share this experiment with us. As always, we never encourage drinking or overindulgence at the Ohio OVI Blog. We feel safe in saying that this individual was going to have a few drinks for the Indians home opener anyway, we just jumped on for the ride. Our test subject was a volunteer and was not paid (although he shook us down for a free lunch this week).

March 31 – The bracelet is installed

The bracelet was installed at 4:50 pm. After being installed I had to wait 30 minutes before I could have a drink. I was told this is done to set up a baseline reading. After 30 minutes, I had two bourbons and diets and some dinner. After dinner I hopped a ride to Around The Corner in Lakewood. I stayed at this bar with friends for a few hours; I had a jack and diet, a shot of Patron, an orange bomb and a gummy bear shot and an Amstel Light (I party). The hour was getting late, and it was at this time I realized I had an experiment to run for Ohio OVI Blog tomorrow and decided that was my limit and hopped a taxi ride home. My BAC when I left Around The Corner was .22, almost three times the legal limit (which is .08).

A few side notes about the SCRAMx bracelet: It vibrates once every 15-30 minutes and is a little bulky around the ankle. This vibration and bulkiness affected my sleep, which made me a little grumpy.

April 1 – The Indians home opener

I don’t know what to say except that the thoughts herein might get a little foggy. I headed downtown around 9:30 am and started with breakfast, a couple of beers and an orange bomb (my preferred breakfast shot). I jumped around to four different bars to meet some friends before heading toward my seat at 12:40. I had another beer and four more shots before heading to the stadium. Once in my seats, I slowed my pace a little and had three beers during the game and also ate a hamburger. I have to say that I considered having a few more after the Tribe went down by double-digit runs.

At this point I have to admit that I was not in the stadium for the Indians’ late run at the White Sox. When I left they still had a goose egg on the board, although I’m not sure what time it was exactly. Herein we’ll have to rely on the SCRAMx, as I lost track of things after I left the stadium. I visited two more bars downtown and then cut myself off a little before 10. Don’t worry, I ate all three meals during day, adding a Panini to my late night diet.

After a long day of drinking and baseball, I hopped a taxi back to my place in Lakewood around 10:30. I had the bracelet removed at 11:30 and fell asleep sitting up in my recliner. It was not my finest moment.

In trying to total up the drinks, I had at least eight beers, three cocktails and can account for no fewer than 14 shots. I suspect I had more than that, but can’t be 100 percent sure.

April 2 – The aftermath

On top of a hangover, I feel a little weird today. I sort of miss the vibration of the bracelet on my ankle. We bonded over time and I feel like I’m missing a part of my leg.

In the end, the results say that my drinking was a bit excessive. My high point, according to the SCRAMx was a blood alcohol level of .349 (almost four and a half times the legal limit) at 8:29 pm. I am 5-foot-11 and 230 pounds, so I’m not exactly a small guy, which means that I probably had more than 14 shots. Based on the BAC calculator.

Thanks for letting me share my thoughts, Ohio OVI Blog. We should do this again sometime soon. (See this attached PDF to view the hour by hour breakdown of the alcohol in my system: OVI Blog – test)

The Ohio OVI Blog would like to thank our test subject and our good friends at Alternative Horizon Counseling for allowing us to experiment with the SCRAMx. The purpose of this bracelet is detect the presence of one drink, if you are assigned this bracelet you are not permitted to have any alcohol as the terms of your probation. Below is a little information about the SCRAMx works.

Technology

The SCRAM System uses an electrochemical fuel cell to detect alcohol. The fuel cell is the same one used in Drager’s Alco-test Breath Devices. At a predetermined interval, a pump in the bracelet pulls a controlled sample to the alcohol sensor for analysis. The amount of reaction of the fuel cell is interpreted and a Trans-dermal Alcohol Concentration (TAC) is calculated. This calculation is an estimation of the Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC).

Tamper Technology is contained within the bracelet and is used to detect several different types of tampers; obstructions, removals, cut straps and damage. The technology used to detect removals and obstruction material is the Infrared (IR) sensor. Combination of the IR sensor, temperature sensor and the fuel cell voltage can be used to confirm obstructions and removals.

The IR sensor is used to make certain the bracelet is on the client and to detect materials being placed between the bracelet and the leg, potentially blocking the faceplate. The IR sensor, which is contained in the SCRAM bracelet, provides an IR beam between the bracelet and the leg of the client; the reflection of this beam is then measured in volts.

The temperature sensor monitors the bracelet temperature to detect possible tampers and removals. The temperature sensor is located in the bracelet, this impacted by the body’s warming effect and the environmental temperature.

Data Interpretation

The Trans-dermal Alcohol Concentration (TAC) readings are the black line and are represented on the scale to the left of the graph. The Infrared (IR) readings are identified on the light blue line and the temperature readings are displayed on the red line and represented by the scale on the right of the graph.

Confirmed Consumption

Alcohol detections confirmed as consumption identify the Blood Alcohol Curve and include both the presence of absorption to the peak with an absorption rate less than 0.05 percent per hour, and the presence of elimination with an elimination rate less than 0.025 percent per hour if the peak was less than 0.150 percent or less than 0.035 percent per hour if the peak is 0.150 percent or above.

0 252

Hello Northeast Ohio. It’s a somewhat sunny opening day of baseball in Cleveland, and we’re headed out to Progressive Field later today.

Before we head out, however, we wanted to give you the rundown on checkpoints for this weekend. After making our usual calls, it appears that there will be no checkpoints this weekend. That said, we believe there will be some heavier saturation points of police downtown this afternoon to handle the traffic from the baseball game.

We also were told that there might be a checkpoint next week in Maple Heights. We’ll keep you updated on that.

Don’t forget to check back with the Ohio OVI Blog next week. As we mentioned in a post earlier this week, we have a test subject who is wearing a SCRAMx monitoring bracelet today for the Indians home opener. We’ll test the monitor’s reading of his alcohol consumption against a chart he’ll keep of his drinks to see how it stacks up. Should be fun.

Until then, drive safely. If you need an attorney for DUI/OVI, give us a call.

0 328

Good Thursday to you, Northeast Ohio. We hope the suddenly chilly weather hasn’t cooled your spirit for the upcoming summer.

For whatever it’s worth, we’re hotter than ever here at the Ohio OVI Blog. We hit the streets on St. Patty’s Day to share our story, and we ended up with some coverage in this week’s Cleveland Scene.

But, as fun as it is to get some publicity, we’re here with a mission: to share information about OVI laws and checkpoints in Ohio. So let’s get down to it. We made our usual list of calls this week, and there’s only one checkpoint scheduled thus far.

Cleveland will have one on March 25 (Friday). The checkpoint will be at St. Clair Avenue and E. 105th Street between 11 pm and 3 am.

Cleveland will also be having a license checkpoint early next week. We’ll share those details once they’re available.

Beyond that, we’ve listed below the other areas we called who either told us they aren’t having a checkpoint or who didn’t have details for us. Here’s your weekly reminder: Whether you’re traveling somewhere with a checkpoint or not, don’t drink and drive. Trust us, you can’t afford it.

Here’s the list of areas we called:

Akron/Summit County – No, Summit County there is one tentatively scheduled for April 29th. We will keep you informed when we know more.
Beachwood – No
Bedford – No
Berea – No
Brooklyn – No
Brooklyn Heights – No

Broadview Heights – No
Brecksville – No

Cleveland Heights – No
Chesterland – No
Elyria – No
Euclid – No

Garfield Heights – No
Kent – No

Lakewood / Ohio Highway Patrol – There was no release this week regarding Cuyahoga County OVI checkpoints run by The Ohio Highway Patrol.
Independence – No
Maple Heights – No
Medina – No

Mentor – No
Middleburg – No

North Ridgeville – No
North Royalton – No
Olmsted Falls – No
Olmsted Township – No
Parma – No
Parma Heights – No
Portage County Sheriff’s Department – No

Rocky River – No
Shaker Heights – No
Seven Hills – No
Seville – No

Streetsboro – No
Strongsville – No
South Euclid – No
University Heights – No
Wadsworth – No

Warren – No
Westlake – No

A couple of reminders for you this week: One, remember that this blog is not legal advice in anyway. We’re distributing public information, but you should contact an attorney if you need legal advice. Check out our About the blog page for more on that. Two, we have been getting a few emails with questions about our goal here at the Ohio OVI Blog. This is a reminder that we never encourage drinking and driving. Quite the opposite. We try to underscore the fact that police have tactics to catch drunk drivers and dealing with an OVI charge is not easy. Please, if you’re going to drink, don’t drive. Period.

0 5503

When we were out in Cleveland during St. Patty’s day, people constantly asked us whether they should refuse to submit to the breathalyzer when asked by a police officer. We did our best to answer this tricky question throughout the day, but we thought it would be best to address it with a little more detail. There are three tests approved in Ohio for use by the police. They are:

Ohio DUI Blood Test (the most accurate – used if a suspect is taken to the hospital because they were injured in a crash)

Ohio DUI Breath Test (by far the most common – most police departments have their own breath test machine at the station)

Ohio DUI Urine Test (the least accurate – but the one most commonly used if drugs are suspected)

If a person refuses to submit to the test or submits to the test and tests over the legal limit, their license is immediately suspended. The suspension is called an Administrative License Suspension (ALS). It is not imposed by a Judge, but by the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. The police officer acts as the BMV’s agent when imposing the suspension.

The ALS is imposed because the law considers driving a privilege and not a right. When one accepts an Ohio Driver’s License, they are agreeing to provide a blood, breath, or urine sample to a police officer if there is probable cause to believe the person is operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Refusing to provide the sample, or providing a sample that tests over the legal limit, results in a suspension.

The length of the Administrative License Suspension imposed depends on two primary factors: First, is this a refusal to submit to a chemical test, or is it a test over the legal limit? Second, how many prior refusals or offenses has the person had in the past 6 years?

—-

OHIO ADMINISTRATIVE LICENSE SUSPENSION CHART
OFFENSE(S) IN PAST 6 YEARS TEST FAILURE 0.08% + TEST REFUSAL
FIRST OFFENSE 90 Day Suspension One Year Suspension
SECOND OFFENSE One Year Suspension Two Year Suspension
THIRD OFFENSE Two Year Suspension Three Year Suspension
FOURTH OR GREATER Three Year Suspension Five Year Suspension
The administrative license suspension (ALS) for failing or refusing a test ends upon conviction following a plea of guilty or no contest, and the time served under the ALS will be credited against the suspension the court imposes for the conviction.

—-

Let’s run through a hypothetical situation to make sure everyone understands how an ALS suspension works.

You get pulled over, the cops have probable cause, and you submit to a field sobriety test and fail. You are then brought to the arresting station’s BAC room. You are read form 2255 (ALS Form). At this point, you refuse to blow. The arresting officer will seize your license, and if this is your first refusal your license will be suspended automatically for one year from the date of refusal. You will not be able to receive driving privileges for 30 days.  However, if you blew and it was less than a .175, your license will be suspended for 90 Days and you will be able to receive driving privileges within 15 days.

A refusal will be on your record for 20 years, meaning even if the charges of an OVI are reduced and you get pulled over 4 years later for an OVI, that prior refusal will elevate the penalties of that OVI. For example, your first OVI in 6 years usually carries 3 days jail or DIP (Driver Intervention Program). However, if this is your first OVI in six years and you have a prior refusal over the last 20 years you face a mandatory minimum of 6 days jail or 3 days jail and 3 days DIP.

For a complete list of OVI penalties in Ohio and how a prior refusal affects you, visit this site http://bit.ly/fAio7J.

Deciding if one should refuse to blow is a question that as an attorney is almost impossible to answer succinctly or with finality. Remember that you never have to perform field sobriety tests or blow into a portable breathalyzer. The ultimate decision is one that you must make based on the totality of the circumstances.

Future posts on the Ohio OVI Blog will include Visual detection of OVI Motorcyclists, limited driving privileges and phase 2 of an automobile stop “personal contact.” Want more answers about OVI in Ohio or need help with a case? Contact us.

0 433

 In our effort to keep the public informed about the dangers of drinking and driving, we thought you would like to know that there will be a checkpoin in Olmsted Falls today for St. Patrick’s Day.

While we don’t have all the details, it will be on Columbia Road and take place between 3 and 7 pm.

If you’re going out today, please remember to drink responsibly. For a complete list of the checkpoints in Northeast Ohio, visit our full blog post from yesterday.

Have a safe holiday. If you know anyone who does run into trouble with OVI/DUI, please contact us to protect your rights.

0 476

If you’re about to head out for St. Patrick’s Day, the time to designate a driver is now. There will be a checkpoint in North Royalton starting this afternoon around 5 pm. It will be on route 82.

 If you’re going out today, please remember to drink responsibly. For a complete list of the checkpoints in Northeast Ohio, visit our full blog post from yesterday.

Have a safe holiday. If you know anyone who does run into trouble with OVI/DUI, please contact us to protect your rights.

0 308

Happy St. Patrick’s Day Ohio OVI Blog readers. As we mentioned yesterday, there is a checkpoint in Cleveland today.

It starts around 5 pm and will take place on Huron between West 3rd and West 6th Streets.

If you’re going out today, please remember to drink responsibly. For a complete list of the checkpoints in Northeast Ohio, visit our full blog post from yesterday.

Have a safe holiday. If you know anyone who does run into trouble with OVI/DUI, please contact us to protect your rights.